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  1. Game Development
Gamedevelopment

Game Development Learning Guides

Learn to design and develop your very own games with this collection of learning guides, covering everything from the basics of SpriteKit to the four key elements of game design.

Each guide contains a hand-picked selection of free game development tutorials and is designed to teach you a new skill or technique. Some are aimed at a practical outcome, like creating a good countdown, while others explore game design theory and mechanics, such as basic 2D platform physics.

With the help of these learning guides, you'll be producing your own games in no time. What will you learn today?

  1. A Beginner's Guide to Coding Graphics Shaders

    3 Posts
    Shader programming sometimes comes off as an enigmatic black magic and is often misunderstood. There are lots of code samples out there that show you how to create incredible effects, but offer little or no explanation. This guide aims to bridge that gap. I'll focus more on the basics of writing and understanding shader code, so you can easily tweak, combine, or write your own from scratch!
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  2. How to Adapt A* Pathfinding to a 2D Grid-Based Platformer

    6 Posts
    In this series, Daniel Branicki explains how to modify a standard A* pathfinding algorithm to work for platformers by taking into account the way gravity restricts vertical movement. The new algorithm could be used to create an AI character that follows the player, or to show the player a route to their goal, for example.
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  3. Understanding Steering Behaviors

    9 Posts
    Steering behaviors aim to help autonomous characters move in a realistic manner, by using simple forces that are combined to produce life-like, improvisational navigation around the characters' environment. They are not based on complex strategies involving path planning or global calculations, but instead use local information, such as neighbors' forces. This makes them simple to understand and implement, but still able to produce very complex movement patterns.
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